I needed to see a filesize change as an automated process was running with no output. On linux, I would simply use the watch command and list (ls) the directory to see the size grow. I didn't expect an exact command match on the windows side, however I did expect something with a somewhat similar functionality. I wrote up a little piece of batch script that handled things, but the output was really ugly made the console scroll far to much. I am fully aware that cygwin already supports the watch tool, but I didn't want to deal with a whole installation and different terminal/command window just for one command. So I decided to minimally clone the linux command called watch.
In standard Microsoft fashion, I wrote it in C# (.net) and rolled it out in a few hours. Mind you, the original process was actually still running by the time I was done. I was able to use my new 'watch' command on Windows to see the files grow. Here's a few screen shots:
picture showing terminal with command executing, all text
picture showing terminal with watch help being shown, all text

Now that the mini app is complete, I figured I'd share more than just my experience.

Here's the source (VS2013) zip: watch.zip (14KB).
Here's the compiled executable, requires .NET 4.5: watch.exe (13KB)

Disclaimer: I am not responsible if this program causes damage to your computer or business. I do not warrant any of the functionality or capabilities of this application. I am not to be held liable for any damages caused by the use of this application. Use at your own risk.
dead
I've been working like crazy studying for my CCNA. I've built up a CCNA lab using GNS3 emulating routers and security appliances while using a few L3 switches I picked up off ebay. The switches are Cisco Catalyst 2948G-L3 switches. This should allow me to do most of what is needed for CCNA and CCNP. picture of a Catalyst 2948G-L3 switch
Garrett Galloway using tweezers and hot air reflow gun to remove a bulb while sporting a fantastic beard. This is a picture based instructable to show the process of replacing the stock lamps on an 06-07 Duramax with LEDs to light the gauge cluster.

Here is a slightly more commented version of this tutorial at instructables.com/id/06-07-Duramax-LED-Gauge-Cluster/
Tools List:
basic sockets and screwdrivers
needle nose pliars
tweezers
flush snips
soldering iron
set of two spoons
magnifying glass (optional)
hot-air reflow station (optional)

Materials:
tape (electrical and/or masking)
flux core solder
resistors (we used 470ohm 1/2 watt)
LEDs (we used 5mm, 7000mcd, 3.3-3.6v, 25mA)

Step 1 - Dash Removal
  • Lower the adjustable steering wheel and, with the key in the ignition and the emergency brake engaged, put the shifter into drive 1.
  • Remove dash shroud and remove bolts holding in the gauge cluster.
  • Disconnect the bus connector from the back of the gauge cluster
Step 2 - Gauge Cluster Disassembly
  • Press the tabs and remove the clear cover to the gauges.
  • Mark needle placement with tape so that upon reassembly the needles are in their original location.
  • Remove gauge needles with even pressure, spoons are awesome.
  • Remove gauge face carefully, it is plastic and discolors upon bending.
  • Press the remaining tabs, to remove the back of the gauge cluster and remove the gauge circuit board.
Step 3 - Lamp Removal and Circuit Identification
  • Plug the circuit board back into the dash and turn on all available lights and indicators.
  • Use a multimeter to identify hot and ground leads on each lamp, MARK APPROPRIATELY with a permanent marker. These lamps are each in a different orientation.
  • Unplug and remove the gauge circuit board from the dash.
  • Remove each of the lamps with a hot tool of your choice, apply heat and use pliers or tweezers to gently pull on the lamp.
  • Be careful not to leave the soldering iron or hot air on a single trace for too long as it may cause damage to the circuit board itself.
Step 4 - LED-Resistor Combo Assembly
  • Take the long lead (anode/positive) on the LED and bend it facing straight up.
  • Snip the long lead at about the top of the LED.
  • Tin the snipped LED lead with solder.
  • On the resistor bend a lead down and snip it at about the length of the resistor.
  • Tin the snipped resistor lead with solder.
  • Join the two tinned leads together with a brief touch of the soldering iron.
  • Bend the remaining leads in towards each other and snip them so that each lead has a 3-5mm inward facing leg and a 3-5mm gap between them.
Step 5 - Solder the LEDs On
  • Tin each of the solder pads on the gauge circuit board with a small bead of solder.
  • Using tweezers or a pair of pliers hold each set of LED-resistor combos in place with the resistor lead on the positive (hot) pad on the board.
  • Quickly solder each lead in place with the iron, this should take less than two seconds per lead. Note that leaving the iron in place too long can damage the led, resistor, surrounding components, and even the circuit board itself.
  • Ensure the LEDs are facing upwards to avoid 'hot spots' within the lighting of the dash.
Step 6 - Test the LEDs
  • Plug the gauge circuit board back into the dash and ensure all indicators light up properly.
  • If any LEDs do not light up, disconnect the board and:
    • First ensure each lead is securely soldered onto the appropriate pad.
    • Check to make sure none of the pads have been inadvertently joined with stray solder - a magnifying glass is wonderful.
    • Ensure proper polarity with multimeter with the board plugged in, make sure you have the right pads identified
  • After ensuring all LEDs are properly operating disconnect the board.
Step 7 - Gauge Cluster Reassembly
  • Carefully place the circuit board on the back plate.
  • Ensure that the new LEDs are not obstructing the top plate and put the two halves together and snap in place.
  • Lay the gauge back display back on to the cluster.
  • Carefully place the gauge needles back on to their appropriate gauge with even pressure.
  • Replace the cluster glass and ensure all of the gauge cluster snaps are fully engaged.
Step 8 - Dash Reassembly
  • Reconnect the gauge assembly bus to the back of the assembly.
  • Ensure all lights still light up.
  • Screw the assembly back in place with the originally removed bolts.
  • Replace the dash shroud.
  • Enjoy your newly lit dash.
Pictures for the Build Process
Picture of dash up close with bezel removed and part of dash removed to expose the bolt (already removed) to remove the gauge cluster Gauge cluster removed but still fully assembled on work bench pushing in pins to remove covers of gauge cluster front frame of gauge cluster with clear cover by itself different angle of gauges on bench different angle of gauges on bench 2 different angle of gauges on bench 3 different angle of gauges on bench 4 Nick Solimini removing gauge needles with spoons a single gauge needle removed multiple guage needles removed and oriented the same way they were taken off gauge cluster up close, note the tape to allow needle placement on reassembly un-modified black and white chevy duramax monolithic gauge cluster pcb - note the blue shrouded lamps un-modified black and white chevy duramax monolithic gauge cluster pcb angle number 2 un-modified black and white chevy duramax monolithic gauge cluster pcb angle number 3 un-modified black and white pcb number 3 poorly focused picture of hot air gun desoldering lamp random picture of stack of papers garrett galloway and nick solimini using multimeter to test leads on lamps to determine positive and negative garrett galloway and nick solimini using multimeter to test leads on lamps to determine positive and negative leads 2 garrett and nick using multimeter 3 garrett galloway and nick using multimeter 5 garrett galloway using hot air tool and tweezers to remove stock lamp on guage cluster test setup for led and resistor combo marked solder pads with red highlighter for LED placement marked solder pads with red highlighter for LED placement 2 marked solder pads with red highlighter for LED placement 3 assembly line step 1 bend and snip resistors assembly line step 3 solder resistors to LEDs helping hand holding LED resistor combo on board for soldering garrett galloway hand soldering resistor and LED in place - helping hand was a failure determined pre-tinning the pads was best method of soldering do to restricted space - shows resulting solder pad bumps poorly lit photo of all LEDs solderd to board for testing - before final upright position was achieved raw black and white monolithic gauge cluster pcb helt temporarily in place to power up LEDs for testing - success random pic of leftovers poorly focused pic of leds after uprighting gauge cluster almost re-assembled gauge cluster almost re-assembled 2 gauge cluster almost re-assembled 3 Garrett Galloway (left) Nick Solimini (right) finial steps of dashboard re-assembly Garrett Galloway (left) Nick Solimini (right) finial steps of dashboard re-assembly 2 finished dash differnt angles, focus and exposures on backlight finished dash differnt angles, focus and exposures on backlight finished dash differnt angles, focus and exposures on backlight finished dash differnt angles, focus and exposures on backlight finished dash differnt angles, focus and exposures on backlight finished dash differnt angles, focus and exposures on backlight finished dash differnt angles, focus and exposures on backlight finished dash differnt angles, focus and exposures on backlight finished dash differnt angles, focus and exposures on backlight finished dash differnt angles, focus and exposures on backlight finished dash differnt angles, focus and exposures on backlight finished dash differnt angles, focus and exposures on backlight step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables step by step submitted to instructables
The population of my free PCB from Dangerous Prototypes went pretty well.
finished lattice next to bus pirate
This was the first time I used any 603 packaged components. These guys are TINY. Getting down to business...
Cleaning and Flux
I started out by cleaning the board and then putting down some flux on the main Lattice IC. Due to the proximity of other components, this would not have been the first component I set down if I could do it over.

Soldering, then desoldering
I did have relatively good luck with the Lattice IC itself. I used the drag soldering method due to the fact it is easy, and I didn't have appropriately sized solder for this job.

I lined up the IC - it stays because I'm using paste flux.

Next I tac the corners in place with little blobs of solder.

I drag the iron across the pins with a lead of solder on top of them and I'm left with ugly shorted leads.

To remove the shorted leads I use solder wick to go over and remove all of the excess solder. This leaves me with a nice completely fitted IC

The LDO
I would also have left this component to one of my last placements due to it's proximity to other components as well.

I started out by fluxing the pads, and then tinning the pads in preperation for the LDO.

This turned out nice and went together pretty simple.

Crystal Clear - or Not
The crystal oscilator was a bit more difficult - likely due to my inexperience with parts like this. I tried several different ways to get the crystal on the board including just fluxing the board, tinning the board pads and then finally the method that worked - tinning the pads on the crystal itself.

This is the images of the successful method - tinned IC pads and lots of flux.

TINY SMD Components
This was not as easy to capture good pictures of, so I just soldered on all of the components and took a few different angles. I tinned the components themselves and then held them in place with a little flux and tacked them down.

Finished Product
I have a few lessons new learned and a solid dev board. Now time to do some hacking...
Recent Changes